Wireframing Client Email

Wireframing Client Email

This is a wireframe I put together to help our team conceptualize the automation for a client throughout the life of our relationship. We found that keeping our clients in the loop was very time consuming during the production of their website. It would be ideal to receive this report every week during the build of their new website and every month after the site has launched. Keeping the client happy would be far less cost than having to replace the client in our rotation. We also built in a way to up-sell the client on services that they could benefit from after reviewing their analytics. This would be a soft sell and have an option for them to contact their consultant directly without receiving a cold call. Our lawyer clients were very busy and hard to get on the phone at times. Having a quick glance at where they stand in their internet marketing is a great way to save their time and ours as well. One of the pain points for our build team was receiving assets like images, content and approvals from the client. This email also shows the client what we are waiting for from them. Giving them an option to log into our system and upload any of the assets we needed to stay within the time frame promised for the project launch. The emails would continue to remind the client that these important assets are needed or their launch date will be moved back. Ongoing Relationship Building Showing the continued work on A/B testing and value added by staying with our company was...
Why Google Search Causes Designer Migraines

Why Google Search Causes Designer Migraines

Is it fair for Google to penalize websites for pushing text based content below the fold? In the age of video, fast internet connections and dynamic images, why would Google create an algorithm that punishes certain markets for giving their users what they demand? Or are they really even punishing them? As a designer, it would be nice to know exactly what this algorithm considers content. Can Google Discern Ads from relevant images? Let’s say I own a photography company that has a website showing off my images. When a user searches for a photography studio on the web, they find my site and all they see is small images beside a few paragraphs of text. Do you think they will hire me to shoot their wedding? Photography is usually sold by large, bold and exciting images that captivate the audience. And with only 2.6 seconds to keep their attention, I cannot sell them with blocks of text. To shove text above the fold would only take away from the experience that the user is seeking. And photography is not the only market that uses images to captivate an audience. Do these images count as “ads” or will Google make the distinction and treat my site fairly? “Rather than scrolling down the page past a slew of ads, users want to see content right away.” Although I do not disagree with this quote, I find myself wondering who it applies to. As you can see here, YouTube has a huge block of ads at the top of their homepage. Do you think they will be penalized? Don’t get me...